Eye Health Education

//Eye Care – Myths and Facts
Eye Care – Myths and Facts 2017-03-17T20:46:15+00:00

Eye Care – Myths and Facts

1 Myth Reading in dim light is harmful to your eyes.
Fact Although reading in dim light can make your eyes feel tired, it is not harmful.
2 Myth It is not harmful to watch a welder or look at the sun if you squint, or look through narrowed eyelids.
Fact Even if you squint, ultra-violet light still gets to your eyes, damaging the cornea, lens and retina. Never watch welding without wearing the proper protection. Never look directly at an eclipse.
3 Myth Using a computer, or video display terminal (VDT), is harmful to the eyes.
Fact Although using a VDT is associated with eyestrain or fatigue, it is not harmful to the eyes.
4 Myth If you use your eyes too much, you wear them out.
Fact You can use your eyes as much as you wish-they do not wear out.
5 Myth Wearing poorly fit glasses damages your eyes.
Fact Although a good glasses fit is required for good vision, a poor fit does not damage your eyes.
6 Myth Wearing poorly fit contacts does not harm your eyes.
Fact Poorly fit contact lenses can be harmful to your cornea (the window at the front of your eye). Make certain your eyes are checked regularly by your eye doctor if you wear contact lenses.
7 Myth You do not need to have your eyes checked until you are in your 40s or 50s.
Fact There are several asymptomatic, yet treatable, eye diseases (most notably glaucoma) that can begin prior to your 40s.
8 Myth Safety goggles are more trouble than they’re worth.
Fact Safety goggles prevent many potentially blinding injuries every year. Keep goggles handy and use them!
9 Myth It’s okay to swim while wearing soft contact lenses.
Fact Potentially blinding eye infections can result from swimming or using a hot tub while wearing contact lenses.
10 Myth Children outgrow crossed eyes.
Fact Children do not outgrow truly crossed eyes. A child whose eyes are misaligned has strabismus and can develop poor vision in one eye (a
condition known as amblyopia) because the brain turns off the misaligned or “lazy” eye. The sooner crossed or misaligned eyes are treated, the less likely the child will have permanently impaired vision.
11 Myth A cataract must be ripe before it can be removed.
Fact With modern cataract surgery, a cataract does not have to ripen before it is removed. When a cataract keeps you from doing the things you like or need to do, consider having it removed.
12 Myth Cataracts can be removed with lasers.
Fact Cataracts cannot be removed with a laser. The cloudy lens must be removed through a surgical incision. However, after cataract surgery, a membrane within the eye may become cloudy. This membrane can be opened with laser surgery.
13 Myth Eyes can be transplanted.
Fact The eye cannot be transplanted. It is connected to the brain by the optic nerve, which cannot be reconnected once it has been severed. The cornea-the clear front part of the eye-can be transplanted. Surgeons often use plastic intraocular lens implants (IOL’s) to replace natural lenses removed during cataract surgery.
14 Myth All eye care providers are the same.
Fact – An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor (M.D.) or doctor of osteopathy (D.O.), uniquely trained to diagnose and treat all disorders of the eye, and is qualified to perform surgery, prescribe and adjust eyeglasses and contact lenses, and prescribe medication.

– An optometrist (O.D.) is an eye doctor who specializes in the medical care of the eye, and can diagnose and treat disorders of the eye and surrounding tissue by prescribing medication, glasses or contact lenses.

– An optician fits, supplies, and adjusts eyeglasses and contact lenses. An optician cannot examine the eyes or prescribe eyeglasses or medication.

This educational material is provided by Dialog Medical.
© Copyright 2005 Dialog Medical
All Rights Reserved

The Eye Center
Call Toll Free 1.888.844.2020

lasik-free-consult-heade2r

The All-New Raindrop® Near Vision Inlay

Raindrop is designed to Improve Near Vision So You Can Once Again See Fine Print, Menus and Your Phone Without the Hassel of Reading Glasses.
If you’re at the age where you need reading glasses to see your phone or read a newspaper, menu, or computer screen, The Eye Center has a better option: The new Raindrop procedure! Click here to Learn More about Raindrop

Call (888) 844-2020 or Click here to Schedule Your Free Consultation.

HIPAA Notice of Patient Privacy Practices

Our Notice of Privacy Practices provides information about how we may use and disclose protected health information about you. The Notice contains a Patient Rights section describing your rights under the law. You have the right to review our Notice before signing this Consent. The terms of our Notice may change. If we change our Notice, you may obtain a revised copy by contacting our office.

You have the right to request that we restrict how protected health information about you is used or disclosed for treatment, payment or health care operations. We are not required to agree to this restriction, but if we do, we shall honor that agreement.

By signing this form, you consent to our use and disclosure of protected health information about you for treatment, payment and health care operations. You have the right to revoke this Consent, in writing, signed by you. However, such a revocation shall not affect any disclosures we have already made in reliance on your prior Consent. The Practice provides this form to comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA).

The patient understands that:

  • Protected health information may be disclosed or used for treatment, payment or health care operations
  • The Practice has a Notice of Privacy Practices and that the patient has the opportunity to review this Notice
  • The Practice reserves the right to change the Notice of Privacy Policies
  • The patient has the right to restrict the uses of their information but the Practice does not have to agree to those restrictions
  • The patient may revoke this Consent in writing at any time and all future disclosures will then cease
  • The Practice may condition treatment upon the execution of this Consent.

For more in-depth details regarding HIPAA and our Privacy Practices, please read: Notice of Privacy Practices  (PDF)

If you have questions about any of this information or the practices of this web site please send an email to info@TheEyeCenter.com 

The Eye Center
1.888.844.2020

Thanks for signing up. You must confirm your email address before we can send you. Please check your email and follow the instructions.
We respect your privacy. Your information is safe and will never be shared.
×
×
Website Privacy Policy

We understand and value your privacy. The Eye Center does not sell or distribute contact information. All data collected through any website form is used only to provide you with better customer service.

At The Eye Center, we leverage cookie based technology to group users into re-marketing audiences who have expressed an interest in our procedures by accessing key pages throughout our website. We do not collect any personally identifying information with this cookie. Audience members may be shown  The Eye Center text and/or image ads on any 3rd party Internet sites or applications for a limited period of time. Visitors may opt out of re-marketing by visiting Ads Settings

The Eye Center
1.888.844.2020

Thanks for signing up. You must confirm your email address before we can send you. Please check your email and follow the instructions.
We respect your privacy. Your information is safe and will never be shared.
×
×